Synopsis: Matthew will speak about the emergence of “Generative Design” in AEC as a disruptive design approach that that allows designers to balance competing goals by leveraging advances in computation such as genetic algorithms, parametric modeling, and performance analysis tools.
Start Time: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 4:00 PM
End Time: Wednesday, September 16, 2020 5:15 PM
Location: Off-Campus Location/S
Address:
Campus: Off Campus
Room: See our website for online access instructions
City, State, Country: NJ US
Fee: N/A
Speaker: Matthew Spremulli, University of Toronto
Sponsor: Department of Landscape Architecture
Category: Talk, Lecture, Seminar
Web Site: http://landarch.rutgers.edu/lectures.html
Contact Name: Vincent Javet
Contact Email: v.javet@rutgers.edu
Contact Phone: (848) 932-9344
Additional Information: Specifically, Matthew will talk about his experiments introducing this new way of thinking and approaching design in both Academia (at the University of Toronto) and in Practice (at the Autodesk Technology Centers). Matthew Spremulli is an Engagement Manager with the Autodesk Technology Centers. He received his Masters in Architecture focusing on digital media, fabrication and urban/landscape design. He has received various awards including a Special Mention from the Società di Cultura La Biennale di Venezia (with Lateral Office) and the Frank Lloyd Wright Fellowship from the University of Toronto. Matthew has extensive experience in design research, experimental practice and education. He has led numerous award winning design projects and high-profile public exhibitions. He was a co-director of the “Arctic Adaptations: Nunavut at 15” project representing Canada at the 2014 Venice Architectural Biennale. He was lead research-designer on the “Future of Suburbia” with MITs Center for Advanced Urbanism for their 2016 Research Biennale. And most recently he was Research Coordinator for the Living Architecture Systems Group forging collaborations between designers, researchers, and industry leaders on experimental architectures that imbue ‘living’ qualities.