Synopsis: Please join us for a fermentation seminar " Rumble in the jungle: gut microbiota and cardiometabolic disease" by Dr. Fredrik Backhed, University of Gothenburg, Sweden Host: Dr. Maria Gloria Dominguez Bello, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Start Time: Wednesday, October 27, 2021 1:00 PM
End Time: Wednesday, October 27, 2021 2:00 PM
Location: Off-Campus Location/S
Address:
Campus: Off Campus
Room: Online
City, State, Country: Online, NJ US
Fee: N/A
Speaker: Dr. Fredrik Backhed, University of Gothenburg
Sponsor: Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology
Category: Talk, Lecture, Seminar
Web Site: https://dbm.rutgers.edu/fermentation-seminars/
Contact Name: Lindsay Vasy
Contact Email: lindsay.vasy@rutgers.edu
Contact Phone: (848) 932-5642
Additional Information: Summary: The microbial ecosystem, microbiota, of the human gut consists of trillions of bacteria and recent data have demonstrated that an altered gut microbiota can be associated with a number of diseases, ranging from obesity and inflammatory diseases to behavioural abnormalities. In an effort to investigate if the gut microbiota is altered in type 2 diabetes we recruited a large population of treatment na´ve individuals and assessed the microbiota of individuals with prediabetes and screen detected type 2 diabetes. We observed that the microbiota starts to change in prediabetes and can identify individuals with type 2 diabetes. To address if the gut microbiota contributes to disease we transplanted the gut microbiota to germ-free mice. There is extensive microbiota-host cross talk that generates signals to extraintestinal organs and it is becoming more evident that a miss-configured microbiota may produce signals that contribute to metabolic diseases. We have observed that the microbiota in type 2 diabetes increase production of imidazole propionate from the amino acid histidine. Imidazole propionate induces signalling through mTORC1 and p62 a signalling pathway that is induced in livers of patients with type 2 diabetes. Exploring how microbially produced metabolites contribute to disease may provide foundations for novel treatment strategies based on the microbiota. Host: Dr. Maria Gloria Dominguez Bello, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology