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CIRU Distinguished Lecture Series-Confucianism and Environmental Ethics

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Synopsis: Professor Mary Evelyn Tucker, Yale University
Start Time: Tuesday, December 6, 2011 4:30 AM
End Time: Tuesday, December 6, 2011 6:00 AM
Location: Alexander Library
Address: 169 College Avenue
Campus: College Avenue
Room: 403
City, State, Country: New Brunswick, NJ US
Fee: N/A
Speaker: Professor Mary Evelyn Tucker, Yale University
Sponsor: Confucius Institute
Category: Talk, Lecture, Seminar
Contact Name: Ying Zhang
Contact Email: yzhang10@rci.rutges.edu
Contact Phone: (848) 932-2490
Additional Information: Mary Evelyn Tucker is a Senior Lecturer and Senior Research Scholar at Yale University where she has appointments in the School of Forestry & Environmental Studies as well as the Divinity School. She is a co-founder and co-director with John Grim of the Forum on Religion and Ecology. Together they organized a series of ten conferences on World Religions and Ecology at the Center for the Study of World Religions at Harvard Divinity School. They are series editors for the ten volumes from the conferences distributed by Harvard University Press. She is also the author of Worldly Wonder: Religions Enter Their Ecological Phase (Open Court Press, 2003), Moral and Spiritual Cultivation in Japanese Neo-Confucianism (SUNY, 1989) and The Philosophy of Qi (Columbia University Press, 2007), and the editor of Confucianism and Ecology (Harvard, 1998), and Hinduism and Ecology (Harvard, 2000). She is a member of the Interfaith Partnership for the Environment at the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Abstract: it is becoming increasingly clear that the environmental crisis will require solutions from many disciplines including science, policy, law, and economics. However, it is also apparent that environmental ethics will be part of the solutions and that these ethics will need to be culturally sensitive. In the case of China such ethics for the environment can be drawn from Confucianism, Daoism, or Buddhism. The deputy vice minister of the environment, Pan Yue, has done just that in developing environmental ethics. This talk will explore the sources of such an ethics in the Confucian tradition. It will point toward the call in China to create an ecological culture. Parking is free on College Avenue Deck. Please visit us at http://www.ciru.rutgers.edu