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Access to Unapproved Drugs for the Desperately Ill- Ethical Challenges and Possible Solutions

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Synopsis: Arthur L. Caplan, PhD is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor of Bioethics and Founding Director of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU Langone Medical Center
Start Time: Thursday, April 27, 2017 12:00 PM
End Time: Thursday, April 27, 2017 1:30 PM
Location: Institute For Health, Health Care Policy And Aging Research(Ifh)
Address: 112 Paterson Street
Campus: College Avenue
Room: conference room, 120
City, State, Country: New Brunswick, NJ US
Fee: N/A
Speaker: Arthur Caplan, PhD
Sponsor: Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research
Category: Talk, Lecture, Seminar
Web Site: http://www.ihhcpar.rutgers.edu
Contact Name: Peg Polansky
Contact Email: mpolansky@ifh.rutgers.edu
Contact Phone: (848) 932-8413
Additional Information: Arthur L. Caplan, PhD is the Drs. William F. and Virginia Connolly Mitty Professor of Bioethics and Founding Director of the Division of Medical Ethics at NYU Langone Medical Center. Dr. Caplan well known to colleagues and the public for his work on moral issues inherent to biomedical endeavors including clinical trials, organ donations, blood safety, equitable distribution of experimental drugs, compassionate care and gene therapy. He has long been an advocate of disclosures to patients about the risks and benefits of participating in studies of new drugs and has encouraged physicians to disclose the financial benefits they receive from drug and medical-device makers. His contributions to public policy are noteworthy including helping to found the National Marrow Donor Program. He secured the first apology for the Tuskegee Syphilis Study from the secretary of HHS in 1991. Criticism about his “hands-on-philosophy” and enthusiastic engagement with the media prompts him to respond, “To me, the whole point of doing ethics is to change people, to change behavior. Why else do it?”